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5455 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 1714, Los Angeles, CA 90036
16542 Ventura Bl. Suite 120 Encino, CA 91436

818.671.4556

PATIENT EDUCATION

Astigmatism
Asymmetric steepening of the cornea or natural lens causes light to be focused unevenly, which is the main optical problem in astigmatism. To individuals with uncorrected astigmatism, images may look blurry or shadowed.

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Dry Eye Syndrome
Persistent dryness, scratching and burning in your eyes are signs of dry eye syndrome. These symptoms alone may be enough to diagnose it.

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Floaters
You may sometimes see small specks or clouds moving in your field of vision. They are called floaters. You can often see them when looking at a plain background, like a blank wall or blue sky.

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Glaucoma
Glaucoma is an eye disease that slowly and painlessly steals away your sight. Glaucoma is called the silent thief of sight because it has no symptoms. However, it is the second leading cause of blindness in the United States.

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Hyperopia
Farsighted individuals typically develop problems reading up close before the age of 40. The farsighted eye is usually slightly shorter than a normal eye and may have a flatter cornea. Thus, the light of distant objects focuses behind the retina unless the natural lens can compensate fully.

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Myopia
Nearsighted individuals typically have problems seeing well at a distance and are forced to wear glasses or contact lenses. The nearsighted eye is usually longer than a normal eye, and its cornea may also be steeper.

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Presbyopia
During middle age, usually beginning in the 40s, people experience blurred vision at near points, such as when reading, sewing or working at the computer. There's no getting around it – this happens to everyone at some point in life, even those who have never had a vision problem before.

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Pterygium
Pterygia are wedge- or wing-shaped growths of benign fibrous tissue with blood vessels (fibrovascular), typically located on the surface tissue of the sclera. In extreme cases, pterygia may grow onto the eye's cornea and interfere with vision.

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