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16542 Ventura Bl. Suite 120 Encino, CA 91436

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Presbyopia

During middle age, usually beginning in the 40s, people experience blurred vision at near points, such as when reading, sewing or working at the computer. There's no getting around it – this happens to everyone at some point in life, even those who have never had a vision problem before.

Currently an estimated 90 million people in the United States either have presbyopia or will develop it by 2014. This is generating a huge demand for eyewear, contact lenses, and surgery that can help people with presbyopia to deal with there failing near vision.



When people develop presbyopia, they find they need to hold books, magazines, newspapers, menus and other reading materials at arm's length in order to focus properly. When they perform near work, such as embroidery or handwriting, they may have headaches or eyestrain, or feel fatigued.

Presbyopia is caused by an age-related process. This is different from astigmatism, nearsightedness and farsightedness, which are related to the shape of the eyeball and caused by genetic factors, disease, or trauma. Presbyopia is generally believed to stem from a gradual loss of flexibility in the natural lens inside your eye. These age-related changes occur within the proteins in the lens, making the lens harder and less elastic with the years. Age-related changes also take place in the muscle fibers surrounding the lens. With less elasticity, the eye has a harder time focusing up close. Other, less popular theories exist as well.

Reading glasses or bifocal eyeglasses are the most common correction for presbyopia. Besides that there is a wide variety of different options available for our patients today as shown on the chart below.

New surgical options to treat presbyopia are being researched and are already available in many countries. One example is Refractec Inc.'s conductive keratoplasty, or NearVision CK treatment, which uses radio waves to create more curvature in the cornea for a higher "plus" prescription to improve near vision. The method was FDA-approved for the temporary reduction of presbyopia in April 2004. (In 2002 it had been approved for mild farsightedness.)

Call our office TODAY at 323-937-2269 to schedule consultation with Dr. Kagan to find out which procedure is best for you!